Eaglets that were rescued from Bangor nest to be released Friday

Back in May, a family of eagles caught the attention of Bangor residents and bird watchers across the state when two adults fell ill and two eaglets were rescued from their nest.

Two baby bald eagles that were rescued from their nest high up in a 90-foot white pine tree on Kenduskeag Avenue in Bangor on Monday after their mother fell ill and their father died. Linda Coan O'Kresik | BDN

Two baby bald eagles that were rescued from their nest high up in a 90-foot white pine tree on Kenduskeag Avenue in Bangor on Monday after their mother fell ill and their father died.
Linda Coan O’Kresik | BDN

The male adult was electrocuted after flying into a power line, while the female adult was treated at Avian Haven in Freedom, and eventually released into the wild. Both adults had ingested a toxin, biologists said.

The latest chapter of the eagle saga will play out on Friday, when the two eaglets — both of which have also been rehabilitated at Avian Haven — are released in Augusta.

Erynn Call, a biologist with the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, said in an email that the owners of Avian Have have determined that the eaglets are both ready to embark upon a new journey in the wild.

Brent Bibles of Unity College climbs up in a 90' white pine tree on Kenduskeag Avenue in Bangor on Monday to rescue two baby bald eagles who's mother fell ill and father died. Linda Coan O'Kresik | BDN

Brent Bibles of Unity College climbs up in a 90′ white pine tree on Kenduskeag Avenue in Bangor on Monday to rescue two baby bald eagles who’s mother fell ill and father died. Linda Coan O’Kresik | BDN

“This is the time of year when young eagles disperse across the state and find areas of abundant food,” Call explained. “Consequently, we’ve decided there is little value in returning the eagles to Bangor and instead will release them along the Kennebec River where food resources are known to be plentiful.”

Call said eaglets would face more severe challenges if released near Bangor.

“This will give these birds a jumpstart and lessen the chances of altercations with other eagles over limited resources,” she wrote. “There have been more eagle deaths and injuries along the Penobscot as compared to the Kennebec, where we know many birds congregate, based on telemetry data and direct observations.

“We suspect the Kennebec River, because of dam removals and better connectivity for fishes, provides better eagle foraging opportunities as opposed to the Penobscot,” she wrote. “It is our hope with the recent removal of the two lowermost dams on the Penobscot, that fish populations and the entire river food web within this watershed will rebound.”

The BDN will be on scene for the release and we’ll share photos, a video and a story as soon as possible Friday afternoon. Stay tuned!

 

 

 

 

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John Holyoke

About John Holyoke

John Holyoke has been enjoying himself in Maine's great outdoors since he was a kid. Today, he's the Outdoors editor for the BDN, a job that allows him to meet up with Maine outdoors enthusiasts in their natural habitat. The stories he gathers provide fodder for his columns, and this blog.