Big fish landed at Long Lake derby

With a record number of registered anglers participating in the 9th annual Long Lake Ice Fishing Derby over the weekend, the chances of being one of the lucky few who cashed in on the $12,500 prize pool weren’t too good.

Three fishermen didn’t worry about those long odds, as each placed among the top three in more than one category.

Chad Albert with the winning brook trout and second-place landlocked salmon. (Photo courtesy of Paul Bernier)

Chad Albert with the winning brook trout and second-place landlocked salmon. (Photo courtesy of Paul Bernier)

Chad Albert of Madawaska was the derby’s big winner, as he caught the largest brook trout of the weekend (2 pounds, 4.4 ounces) and the second-largest landlocked salmon (4 pounds, 14.6 ounces). Those two fish earned him a nifty $2,000.

Ryan Wishart of Woodland also placed in two divisions, catching the biggest cusk (11 pounds, 6.8 ounces), and the third-heaviest brook trout (1 pound, 10 ounces). Those two fish earned Wishart $1,250.

And in the youth division for anglers age 13 and younger, Dillon Drew of Caribou earned $200 by finishing second in both the landlocked salmon (3 pounds, 0.2 ounces) and brook trout (1 pound, 4.4 ounces) categories.

The 743 anglers who participated set a new record; last year, 637 people entered the derby.

David Drew with the winning landlocked salmon. (Photo courtesy of Paul Bernier)

David Drew with the winning landlocked salmon. (Photo courtesy of Paul Bernier)

Derby chairman Paul Bernier said organizers are planning on a $15,000 cash purse for next year’s edition of the derby, which allows anglers to fish on Long, Cross, Square, Eagle, St. Froid, Glazier and Beau lakes.

This year’s results:

Salmon, age 14 and over: 1. David Drew, Caribou, 5 pounds, 9.2 ounces, $1,500; 2. Chad Albert, Madawaska, 4 pounds, 14.6 ounces, $1,000; 3. Real Pelletier, Madawaska, 4 pounds, 12.6

Dustin Farrington with the winning salmon in the youth division. (Photo courtesy of Paul Bernier)

Dustin Farrington with the winning salmon in the youth division. (Photo courtesy of Paul Bernier)

ounces, $500; 13 and under: 1. Dustin Farrington, Frenchville, 4 pounds, 13.6 ounces, $150; 2. Dillon Drew, Caribou, 3 pounds, 0.2 ounces, $100; 3. Vance Albert, Fort Kent, 2 pounds, 12.8 ounces, $75;

Togue, age 14 and over: 1. Ben Bouchard, Wallagrass, 7 pounds, 1.6 ounce, $1,500; 2. Scott Long, Clair, New Brunswick, 5 pounds, 5.2 ounces, $1,000; 3. Brian Plourde, St. Agatha, 5 pounds, 4.4 ounces, $500; 13 and under: 1. Hunter Simard, Wallagrass, 5 pounds, 3.4 ounces, $150; 2. Emily Labbe, Eagle Lake, 3 pounds, 15.2 ounces, $100;

Chad Albert with the winning brook trout and second-place landlocked salmon. (Photo courtesy of Paul Bernier)

Chad Albert with the winning brook trout and second-place landlocked salmon. (Photo courtesy of Paul Bernier)

Brook trout, age 14 and over: 1. Chad Albert, Madawaska, 2 pounds, 4.4 ounces, $1,000; 2. Mike Thibodeau, Frenchville, 2 pounds, 2.8 ounces, $750; 3. Ryan Wishart, Woodland, 1 pound, 10 ounces, $500; 13 and under: 1. Amber Moir, Woodland, 1 pound, 5.6 ounces, $150; 2. Dillon Drew, Caribou, 1 pound, 4.4 ounces, $100; 3. Brody Albert, Fort Kent, 1 pound, 1.4 ounces, $75;

Muskie: 1. Roland Soucy, Allagash, 14 pounds, 5 ounces, $750; Mike Bourgoin, St. Francis, 11 pounds, 15 ounces, $500; 3. Crystal Dambois, Presque Isle, 10 pounds, 12 ounces, $250; Cusk: 1. Ryan Wishart, Woodland, 11 pounds, 6.8 ounces, $750; 2. Mason Raymond, Presque Isle,

Amber Moir with the winning brook trout. (Photo courtesy of Paul Bernier)

Amber Moir with the winning brook trout. (Photo courtesy of Paul Bernier)

9 pounds, 9.8 ounces, $250; 3. Nathan Raymond, Hermon, 9 pounds, 9.2 ounces, $100; Booby prize (most perch): Heather Pelletier, Woodland, 230 perch; Largest perch: Ron Grover, Ashland, 1 pound, 1.4 ounces

 

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John Holyoke

About John Holyoke

John Holyoke has been enjoying himself in Maine's great outdoors since he was a kid. Today, he's the Outdoors editor for the BDN, a job that allows him to meet up with Maine outdoors enthusiasts in their natural habitat. The stories he gathers provide fodder for his columns, and this blog.