Hunter reads column, donates a whole deer

(Photo courtesy of Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry) Jason Hall, Emergency Food Assistance director for the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry, shows some of the game meat already donated to the Hunters for the Hungry program. The program is again seeking donations of meat which is distributed to community kitchens, pantries and shelters around the state. Some 3,000 pounds of game meat were donated last year.

Last week I told you about the state’s Hunters for the Hungry program, and encouraged folks to consider giving a portion of their harvest to those who are in need of food.

I told you that, according to a Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry press release, a single deer could provide as many as 110 meals.

I told you that program administrators will accept any quantity of meat from people who want to donate.

And I told you that you could call 1-800-4DEER-ME to participate in the program.

It didn’t take long after that column ran before I received an email that made my day.

Jason Hall, the director of Emergency Food Assistance and Hunters for the Hungry for the ACF, was checking in to say that the column had already paid dividends.

“Had a call 15 minutes ago and the person saw your write-up and called to donate an entire deer in Perham,” Hall wrote. “Which, coincidentally, is the same town [where] a family with a rare blood disorder is in great demand for venison. The family cannot eat store-bought meat and depend on the generosity of others and Hunters for the Hungry.”

With that in mind, here’s the phone number again: 1-800-4DEER-ME. Or, if you prefer, you can go to for more information.

Come on. Give a little. You’ll be glad you did.

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John Holyoke

About John Holyoke

John Holyoke has been enjoying himself in Maine's great outdoors since he was a kid. Today, he's the Outdoors editor for the BDN, a job that allows him to meet up with Maine outdoors enthusiasts in their natural habitat. The stories he gathers provide fodder for his columns, and this blog.